Volume 3, Issue 1, January 2017, Page: 5-13
Compliance to National Infant and Young Child Feeding Recommendation and Associated Factor Among Mothers of Children 6-23 months-of-age in Gombora District, Southern Ethiopia: Community Based Cross Sectional Study
Aberham Nuramo Chaimiso, Gombora Woreda Health Office, Hadiya Zone, Southern Ethiopia
Terefe Markos Lodebo, Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Health, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Meseret Temrat Gebretsadik, Department of Population and Family Health, Institute of Health, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Abinet Arega Sadore, Department of Health Education and Behavioral Science, Institute of Health, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Received: Mar. 14, 2017;       Accepted: Mar. 25, 2017;       Published: Apr. 26, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijcems.20170301.12      View  2093      Downloads  55
Abstract
Background: Nutrition in infancy and early childhood is a critical determinant of health and productivity of the individual throughout life. During this period, appropriate, safe, nutritionally adequate and frequent feeding is essential. Despite this recommendation complementary feeding is commonly inappropriately practiced. There is no information compliance to national IYCF. Objective: To assess compliance to national IYCF recommendation and associated factors among mothers of children 6-23 months of age in Gombora district, Southern Ethiopia, 2016. Methods and Materials: Community-based cross-sectional study design was employed in Gombora district from March 1 to March 30, 2016. The data were collected from 379 respondents selected by simple random sampling technique using pre-tested and semi-structured interviewer administered questionnaire. Bivariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were employed to identify factors associated with compliance to IYCF. Results: Of the total 379 study subjects,13.5% (95% CI=10,17.5) of the respondents were reported as they comply with national IYCF recommendation; the odds being compliant to national IYCF recommendation was 5.26 times higher than for those respondents (9-12) grades of educational status and primary education (1-8) (AOR=5.26; 95% CI:2.318, 11.914), accordingly the odds being compliant was 3.88 times higher than for those mothers of children within the age group (18-23) months and mothers of children age (6-11) months (AOR=3.88; 95% CI:1.641, 9.162), the odds of being compliant to national IYCF for antenatal care visits greater than four visit was 3.95 times higher than other types of visit antenatal visit (AOR=3.95; 95% CI:1.840, 8.488) and similarly the odds of being compliant was 2.95 times as much for those respondent who had postnatal care visit than no post-natal care visit (AOR=2.95; 95% CI:1.318, 6.349) and the odds being non-compliant to national IYCF recommendation was 81% times among those who were not knowledgeable on indicators IYCF than those knowledgeable (AOR=0.19; 95% CI:0.075, 0.465) and the odds being compliant 6.02 times as much for those counseled on IYCF than those with no counseling on IYCF (AOR=6.02; 95% CI:2.786, 12.998). Conclusion and recommendations: This study revealed that compliance to national IYCF recommendation was low. Nutrition education to mothers at every contact opportunity was recommended and mothers who were completed only primary education need more attention. All mothers must be encouraged to make antenatal care follow up at least four times.
Keywords
Compliance, IYCF, Children, Ethiopia
To cite this article
Aberham Nuramo Chaimiso, Terefe Markos Lodebo, Meseret Temrat Gebretsadik, Abinet Arega Sadore, Compliance to National Infant and Young Child Feeding Recommendation and Associated Factor Among Mothers of Children 6-23 months-of-age in Gombora District, Southern Ethiopia: Community Based Cross Sectional Study, International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medical Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 1, 2017, pp. 5-13. doi: 10.11648/j.ijcems.20170301.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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